Fuel measurement-182

Fuel measurement-182

I'm concerned about innacurate measurement of fuel using the sump method.
I started a 3.4 hr flight with 55 gallons, and ended with just 4 gallons measurable. (15 gal/hr!!)  I refueled with 46 gallons which should have brought my total to 50 gallons, but instead it read 56 gallons.

I calculated the fllight to have over 10 gallons left over, based on a fuel burn of 13 gal/hr.

At extremely low tank volumes (under 5 gallons) is it sometimes impossible to measure any fuel?

Thank you

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

Which 182 year/model do you have? From 1956 through the 1978 182Q, bladders were used. Beginning with the 1979 182Q, Cessna changed to integral wet wings.

If you have bladders, they may not be fitted in place properly.

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

Hi, thank you for your response. It is a 1965 with the bladders. Would  most aviation mechanics be able to tell if they are fitted correctly?
KH

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

Yes. Wrinkes across the bottoms of the bladders can trap fuel (and water), and AD 84-10-01 R1 requires inspection of the bladders (among other things) for bottom wrinkles.

AD 75-16-01 requires new placards for the fuel selector and wing filler opening to reflect reduced system fuel capacity.

Also, snap fasteners and hangers are used to position and secure the bladders properly. If you have a serious deficit in capacity, the fasteners and hangers should be checked to ensure they're all secured. The 100-series maintenance manual has the bladder removal and installation procedures.

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

I have 1962 182, and replaced the bladders over that last 2 years. I use a measuring device I got from Jaair. It is a tube marked in gallons for my long range tanks, and I find it accurate to within a gallon. As previously posted, you may have some wrinkles, causing the "full" tank to be less than what they can actually hold.
Glenn

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

I have the same issue.  How are the wings opened up to inspect the bladders?

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

Regardless of wrinkles or anything else there is one way to do it.
Fly until almost empty, then drain the rest.
Now get yourself a stick and get your friendly fuel guy to add 2 gallons - mark the stick. Now add another 2 gallons and mark the stick.  Keep doing that until you are full. Now, maybe 3rd party fuel measurers may not be accurate - but your stick will be dead on.
Of course you should still check that your bladders are installed correctly - but this WILL give you an accurate measure.

HTH

Tony

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

Chris,
The wings don't open up.  You have to look through the fuel cap openings to check the bladders.
A long skinny arm is also helpful.
Reaching in and feeling for a flat (hopefully not wrinkled) bottom.
You can also feel the inside sides and top to assure they are in place.

You'll note that the fuel cap is in a round plate, about 10-12" in diameter.  That plate comes off and the whole bladder gets removed and replaced through that hole.
There are snaps on the inside top part of the wing and the top of the bladder.  A long skinny arm reaches inside the bladder and pushes the  top of the bladder and snaps it in place...this is done be "feel".
Long range bladders are even more fun!!!

Michael

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Re: Fuel measurement-182

As you know. Do not leave bladder tanks low on fuel for very long.
The fuel helps keep the bladders from drying out. 
The action of flight helps slosh the fuel to all the inside surfaces of the bladder.
If you suspect you have a problem inside the bladder, use an inspection mirror and a good explosion proof light.

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