Newsflash

Schweiss Doors, a Minnesota-based company providing quality bi-fold and hydraulic one-piece doors for agricultural buildings, aircraft hangars, businesses, and other installations, announces it has developed a new, more powerful, and smoother-running hydraulic pump system. It is the Red Power.

Mike Schweiss, owner of the company, said that, since the system was first introduced at various trade shows around the United States, farmers, ranchers, and pilots have been asking for it by name.

Cessna Owner Organization
Mountain Flying
Written by Scott Stahl    Thursday, 10 January 2013 08:27    PDF Print E-mail

Many pilots have heard the term “mountain flying.” The expression usually conjures up images of fly-fishing trips via short fields and tundra tires. However, the FAA defines mountainous terrain as any terrain with an elevation above 5,000 feet mean sea level (MSL). This definition expands the idea to include much of the United States. While romantic images of fly fishing may be the first thing that comes to mind, the reality is many domestic trips may begin, end, or stop over in mountainous terrain. Mountain flying is a great way for a pilot to see some of the greatest beauty in the United States while providing a fantastic opportunity to enhance and improve knowledge related to weather, atmospheric conditions, aircraft performance, and terrain avoidance procedures. Few would argue the breathtaking scenic opportunities that mountain flying makes available. With careful planning and consideration, mountain flying can also be done with a high degree of safety. It is challenging for the best pilot and enlightening for the newest. The scope of this article is to discuss some of the unique considerations that apply to operations in mountainous terrain. If you are interested in learning more, several training courses are tailored specifically to flying aircraft in mountainous terrain, such as the one offered by the Colorado Pilots Association.

Like any typical pre-flight planning process, a flight in mountainous terrain should include a thorough review of factors related to the day’s trip. These include weather, terrain, aircraft performance, route planning, and even hypoxia.

Read more... Last Updated ( Wednesday, 15 January 2014 13:46 )
 


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