Cessna 182 landings

Cessna 182 landings


I  am a student pilot in the market for a newer airplane and I have considered the Diamond DA40 and the Cessna 182. However many people have told me that the Cessna 182 is not a good plane for a student due to difficult landings. I like many things about a 182 but as a 10 hour student concerned that it would be challenging to land and that I might break it! What do you think of using the 182 as a trainer?

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

It should not be much of a problem if you have an instructor that is familiar with a 182. I keep mine trimmed "up" a bunch and fly with power to the runway. There isn't any "float" with a 182 at slow speed. The power helps keep the nose up, also.
Glenn
182E

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Back when I was instructing I had a couple students that went out and purchased a 182.  The start in C172s and just figured they would finish up in their own aircraft.  These guys all did just fine and are still flying their 182s today.  The 182 had a bad wrap for not having a strong enough firewall.  Guys would come in and land on the nose gear, the firewall would get bent, then the nose gear would push up into the engine compartment, and then the prop would strike the ground.  All bad things that occured because of bad technique.  If you are aware that this can happen, I think you are well on your way to avoiding it.  Also, I am not sure about the new 182s, but it would make sense that Cessna would have added a little reinforcement in that area.  You might want to check on that if you are considering a newer 182.  Of course that still does not mean that you can land on the nose gear, just that it might be a little more foregiving.

Good Luck

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

My 1999 182S is just as prone to nose landings as all 182s.  In fact, the AOPA Air Safety Foundation produced a document on the safety history of the 182.  One fact stands out quite clear -- the 182 has twice the rate of landing accidents as a typical GA aircraft.  I bought the airplane at a time when I had not flown in over six years and had over 360 hours in Piper aircraft.   The key was finding a knowledgeable instructor who knew the "quirks" of the 182.  Once I learned how to use the trim and to set up a slightly higher nose-up attitude in the final stages of the flare, I have not had any problems -- regardless of whether we had a full load in back or just two big guys in the front.

As I understand the history, most 182 nose wheel strikes occur AFTER an initial bounce.  Low time pilots will often push down the nose after a bounced landing instead of just releasing back pressure.  This action, combined with the "higher" nose heaviness, causes the 182 to settle quickly in a nose first attitude.  This has taken many pilots by suprise and leads to "nose wheel first" impact with the runway.  Landing first on the nose wheel does not always damage the firewall. "Flying" any airplane nose first into the runway will always cause an accident.

The POH stresses the importance of NOT attempting to land immediately after a "bounced" first attempt - the POH reccommends a "go-around".

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Glenn, Bryan, Mike,

Thanks for all your information related to landing a 182. This is very useful for me and could solve many problems innthe future.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

<HTML>I have a 1966 182J. It's a heavy-feeling airplane, but about the most docile thing in the air.  Once you learn how to land it, you won't have any problems. The nosewheel stuff is all true, but proper technique will prevent any problems. (Somewhere in it's history, I believe during the 70s, Cessna took an inch off of the length of the "dangling", unweighted nosewheel, so that it would be less prone to striking the ground first).

I pretty much always land with the yoke all the way back, and that's a lot easier with a lot of nose-up trim.  In fact the biggest difference between landing a 172 and a 182 is the use of trim is necessary (unless you're a body builder) in a 182.  The other thing to watch out for is carb ice, but you probably already know the technique for that.

If you are really considering a 182, get a copy of "The Skylane Pilot's Companion". It's hard to find, but you can still get it - I got mine on eBay.

Those, combined with increased gph are about the only potential "negatives".  There are lots of great things about the 182!  It's a large comfortable airplane with tons of useful load.  It will operate out of some pretty short fields. It's very stable.  And you can't beat the sound of an O470!</HTML>

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Joe,
The fact that you can get 30-50 mph more in a 182 than in a 172, does not make the extra fuel used a negative.
If I am just out "burning holes in the sky", then I throttle back to 15-17mp and 2200 rpm. Then my fuel burn is like a 172. If I am going somewhere, then I run the engine at 22-2200 for a fuel burn of about 12.5gph.
I agree that the sound of the O-470 is neat!
Glenn

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

The 182 is an easy aircraft to fly, and performs well, except during landing. It is very nose heavy, and tough keep it from floating or bouncing, unless you can plan your flare for the bottom of the white arc. I finally found out that a couple of heavy sand bags in the baggage compartment fixes this problem. It makes landings feel like a 172.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I am a student pilot about to go for my check ride and I bought a 182M (1969) about a month ago.  I initially had the same problem with my landings.  After struggling with it a little, I placed a 6 gallon can of water, fully secured, in the aft section of the baggage compartment.  The extra 50 pounds with just two people in the front gave me a slight advantage.  Once I got relatively consistent, I reduced the water to 25 pounds and tried again and was able to start getting decent flare.  The one thing that I figured out of late is that a slight touch of power just before the flare also works like magic for the flare.  I have about 10 hours in the 182, but I have not as yet thrown out the water from the baggage area.  But the one thing that is very different from a 172 is the amount of yoke travel you get when trying a decent flare landing in a 182.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Purchased a new 182T with the G1000 glass cockpit and love flying it. However, landing too has been a concern. It seems never two landing are the same. Nevertheless, I have found that to keep from bouncing using a little power entering the flare then reduce power and pull back on the wheel helps. However at times, you may find yourself coming in hotter than you want. If I do for some reason bounce, I quickly add power to keep the nose up and try flaring again.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Wow! What would you do in a 185? !82 is a pussycat!!!

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I purchased a 182 with the G1000 last summer and I havent had a bad landing yet.  It flies and lands great.  I had 275 hours at that time and now have about 75 hours in the plane.  I also have about 25 hours in a 1980 182T-RG and its a great plane too.

I highly recommend a 182.

John B. Ervin

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I agree john,someone reading this maybe quite concerned with the 182 landing characteristics.Only an occasional pilot of an 182 i have found them quite tame.Much better behaved in a crosswind than the venerable 185,helio,and beaver.If one is trained sufficiently and proficient and not bouncing and then landing on the nose wheel instead of the mains their aircraft will maintain a much better resale value.Good lord,this is an easy to fly training wheel aircraft.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I agree the 182T G1000 is a heavy bird on the controls, but saying that, I ve never had a bad landing in one and I dont fly them regularly, perhaps 10 hrs a year over 3 flights (normally LA/Vegas!) Main advice i have is to nail the approach speed, 75kts approaching short final, then reduce to 70 and 65-70 kts over the numbers (full flap). Should already have enough back trim on from slowing the plane down. If its not quite right, ditch the approach and go around - dont be tempted to mess about with it or try to push a bad position - if you bounce, go around.
Never felt the need to apply power just before the flare or put ballast in the hold.
I love the plane and it does everything I want - in comfort and style.
That said tho, I would nt recommend it to low hrs pilots, its just a little too fast, slippery and complex. If you get it wrong it will bite you.
I have over 200 hrs over a variety of types, much of this in complex's and am currently studying for CPL.
Once your trained properly with appropriate experience, this is a great aircraft and one i thoroughly recommend.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I'am presently flying a 182 and is loving it, i must admit tho that at first it waz a little tricky and even if u have more 500hurs in it u stil can't get to comfy in any landings.......i started on the 182 with 190hurs of experience in a 152... it waz really an up grade....one thing i learn on my own, whenever its gusty ex.35+knots u have to use less flaps with a faster appoarch speen and land with little flare....it would land like a jet..........the windgust is always present where i fly.....

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I'm a new pilot from Romania, Europe. I'm considering buying a 182. I have a short runway - about 1600 ft (485 m). There is a chance to operate the 182 on it safely? It would be better than a 172?

Thanks for any help!

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

"I'm a new pilot from Romania, Europe. I'm considering buying a 182. I have a short runway - about 1600 ft (485 m). There is a chance to operate the 182 on it safely? It would be better than a 172?

Thanks for any help!"

Remember your density altitude!  I can get my 182C fastback up and out in that distance easily on a normal Phoenix Arizona day. I would wait until sundown if I were at say,....a high New Mexico airport on a hot day.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Can anyone else shed some light on this one ?? I am a low hour, 150hr CPL student, and we have been moved across onto the C182 for our final CPL flight test. I am struggling with the short field landings, in particular the flare, I seem to constantly flare too high as the approach makes me feel as though we are about to plough into the ground. I have tried trimming down final so that I am holding forward pressure on the control column but this doesn't seem to be helping much. Any more info from more experienced 182 pilots would be greatly appreciated !

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I agree with Joe wholeheartedly about just how stable and docile the 182 really is.  I own a 182H, and noticed almost immediately on the first few flights just how stable of an aircraft it is.  The data on hard landings, after a bounce, cannot be ignored.  However, going into ownership of a 182 knowing that, and having an instructor that understands the 182 should really help you avoid any problems.  The idea of putting a water can or other such (secured!) weight is a popular idea, and a good one that my instructor suggested.  I didn't do that, but still learned the airplane without a hiccup.  And, as with all flying, I'm continuing to learn.  It's a great a/c.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

bww Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Can anyone else shed some light on this one ?? I
> am a low hour, 150hr CPL student, and we have been
> moved across onto the C182 for our final CPL
> flight test. I am struggling with the short field
> landings, in particular the flare, I seem to
> constantly flare too high as the approach makes me
> feel as though we are about to plough into the
> ground. I have tried trimming down final so that I
> am holding forward pressure on the control column
> but this doesn't seem to be helping much. Any more
> info from more experienced 182 pilots would be
> greatly appreciated !
PK.
1) Get your seat higher. Crank it up or seat on a cushion. You need the visibility over the nose. The 182 seats nose high.
2) For short fields landings. Go out and set full flaps, practice slow flight at final approach speed, landing configuration, set a 500 fpm rate of descend with some power and do a few 90 degree turns to simulate base to final turns, get comfortable doing this, trim for speed, you might also practice going around from this configuration, get used to that, then go and practice landings. Take your time to get your confidence back. If you bounce, go around. If you open the throttle a little bit prior to touch down, you will get airflow over the elevators and they will work better for the flare, not too much though..Good luck!!!

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Joe Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> bww Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Can anyone else shed some light on this one ??
> I
> > am a low hour, 150hr CPL student, and we have
> been
> > moved across onto the C182 for our final CPL
> > flight test. I am struggling with the short
> field
> > landings, in particular the flare, I seem to
> > constantly flare too high as the approach makes
> me
> > feel as though we are about to plough into the
> > ground. I have tried trimming down final so that
> I
> > am holding forward pressure on the control
> column
> > but this doesn't seem to be helping much. Any
> more
> > info from more experienced 182 pilots would be
> > greatly appreciated !
> PK.
> 1) Get your seat higher. Crank it up or seat on a
> cushion. You need the visibility over the nose.
> The 182 seats nose high.
> 2) For short fields landings. Go out and set full
> flaps, practice slow flight at final approach
> speed, landing configuration, set a 500 fpm rate
> of descend with some power and do a few 90 degree
> turns to simulate base to final turns, get
> comfortable doing this, trim for speed, you might
> also practice going around from this
> configuration, get used to that, then go and
> practice landings. Take your time to get your
> confidence back. If you bounce, go around. If you
> open the throttle a little bit prior to touch
> down, you will get airflow over the elevators and
> they will work better for the flare, not too much
> though..Good luck!!!
By the way .Last post, JOE, I am a different Joe than the other person.
Lest use joewildblue, instead.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I have 400 hours in my 1978 182Q...i was flying yesterday, in clear skies (57deg.F) for an hour when the engine began to miss, and run rough. I was at 5500 feet, and pulled carb heat and it immediately smoothed out....i waited a minute and started to push it in and it ran rough as soon as i did this. I pulled it back out, and it smoothed again. I continued on to my destination with the carb heat half in.
That afternoon, on returning home, on climbout, it began to miss again, 1/2 carb heat took care of it.I would love to hear comments, as i said, in 400 hrs. in this 182 she's never missed a lick.
thanks

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

I live in Oregon and own a really nice 1969 Cessna 182M. The other day my instructor was reviewing soft field landings and guiding me through it. Unfortunately he kept telling me to pull my nose up when we suddenly hid a wind shear and there was no time to add power, and the plan instantly fell onto the rundway from about ten feet high as though it had been dropped. BAM!  It then bounced about ten feet high as well and I thought for sure there would be structural damage, but apprently threre is none. We did not hit on the nose wheel thank goodness (I have a reinforced firewall STC on my plane anyhow). My big question here is, HOW MUCH CAN THE LANDING GEAR ON THESE PLANS TAKE BEFORE DAMAGE OCCURS? In 1972 they changed the gear to the straight pipe, whereas I have the older leaf springs (still used on the 206 models).  I know this is a subjective question, but is there any way to tell what the impact would have to be on the mains before metal starts bending? Most people agree the 182 is a tough old bird.

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

Hi out there Del,

I had the same thing happen today in a 1972 182P.  It wasn't too windy, wind was pretty much down the runway gusting to 17kts.  On flareout (guessing 4-5 ft above the ground) the thing just quit flying - like somebody cut the string!  The plane bounced about 8 or so feet into the air, I added power and it settled into a normal landing (luckily).  I too was worried about damage, but everything seemed OK upon inspection.  The P model has the tube gear, not leaf spring.  Anyway, just another reason to fly it in faster with only 20 degrees of flaps when winds are gusty. 


"I live in Oregon and own a really nice 1969 Cessna 182M. The other day my instructor was reviewing soft field landings and guiding me through it. Unfortunately he kept telling me to pull my nose up when we suddenly hid a wind shear and there was no time to add power, and the plan instantly fell onto the rundway from about ten feet high as though it had been dropped. BAM! It then bounced about ten feet high as well and I thought for sure there would be structural damage, but apprently threre is none. We did not hit on the nose wheel thank goodness (I have a reinforced firewall STC on my plane anyhow). My big question here is, HOW MUCH CAN THE LANDING GEAR ON THESE PLANS TAKE BEFORE DAMAGE OCCURS? In 1972 they changed the gear to the straight pipe, whereas I have the older leaf springs (still used on the 206 models). I know this is a subjective question, but is there any way to tell what the impact would have to be on the mains before metal starts bending? Most people agree the 182 is a tough old bird."

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Re: Cessna 182 landings

ALL GOOD AND REASONABLE ANSWERS FROM THE OWNERS AND INSTRUCTORS. ONE I THOUGHT WAS ESPECIALLY GOOD BUT NEEDED "A LITTLE MORE" WAS THE ONE ABOUT PRACTICEING AT SLOW FLIGHT WITH FULL FLAPS...  THIS IS WHAT I TEACH...LISTEN TO YOUR ENGINE/AIRFLOW NOISE AT LOW AIRSPEEDS KNOW WHAT ADDING JUST 100 RPM SOUNDS LIKE WITHOUT LOOKING...CAN BE HELPED BY HOLDING HAND ON THROTTLE WITH INDEX FINGER ON FRICTION LOCK/THROTTLE PASS-THRU. MOVE JUST SLIGHTLY ADVANCING POWER 100 RPM ONLY AT FLARE IT WILL HELP KEEP NOSE UP WITH CONTACT HAPPENING ON MAINS. AND YOU DON'T HAVE TO CARRY FIVE GALLONS OF WATER OR SAND-BAGS IN THE BAGGAGE .THIS WORKS FOR PIPERS TOO!

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