Obtaining a PMA

Obtaining a PMA

<HTML>Can anyone give me some information on getting a PMA for an interior part(s) I am ready to manufacture. Is this a difficult procedure and is it full of red tape. What I am making requires no maintenance and does not effect any structural part of the airplane or restrict any existing moveable parts. Its is also non electrical and uses no screws to attach therefore it will not require any special testing. It also is a replacement part for an interior part that already exists on an airplane and is constructed using all FAA approved and certified materials. What are the fees or cost involved and time span.,,,Thanks</HTML>

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Re: Obtaining a PMA

<HTML>Parts Manufacturing Authority is governed under FAA Order No. 8110.42 and information may be found at: http://www.faa.gov/avr/air/air100/811042a1.pdf
Not knowing exactly the nature of your "part", it's difficult to assess if your idea actually requires PMA.  Simple interior parts, if not designated specifically as type-specific "replacement" parts may not need PMA approval.  Many times a manufacturer will produce parts for owners to install under rules that may fall under "preventive maintenance", as the owner may finish the part, and obtain necessary approval, if any, themselves.  You might read up on the process at the above link, and then contact your local FSDO to determine whether or not it applies to your particular idea.  Good luck.</HTML>

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Re: Obtaining a PMA

<HTML>According to FAR 21.303, "No person may produce a modification or replacement part for sale for installation on a type certificated product unless it is produced pursuant to a Parts Manufacturer Approval"   There are 4 situations when this statememt would not apply.  1) Parts produced under a type production certificate.  2) Parts produced by an owner or operator for maintaining or altering his own aircraft.  3)  Parts produced under an FAA Technical Standard Order.  4)  Standard parts (such as bolts and nuts) conforming to established industry or U.S. specifications. 

The above methods are the only ways the FAA allows parts to be made and installed on certificated aircraft.  Dont get caught in the "its only a interior item" thinking.  I have personally dealt with a situation where Falcon Jet made a "hanger holder" for an interior closet specifically for one of our customers Falcon 50.  Everyone thought since they are the manufacturer of the aircraft it was OK.  Wrong!! Our local FSDO actually called Falcon Jet at Little rock. Since this part was never part of the original certificated product, (item 1 above) they were asked where was the approval to produce the part.  They admitted they had no approval, needless to say we couldnt install it. 

FAR 21.303 lists the only ways that parts can be produced.  In addition, it details the procedures and requirements for obtaining a PMA.


Sal</HTML>

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<HTML>The critical wording is "replacement part".  It depends upon Jerry's exact idea.
While absolutely true that 21.303 says those things,  the reference I was making to "interior" parts stipulated that the part was actually completed by the owner, as allowed under 21.303 (b)(2).  I'm not taking exception to Sal's comments, but again, it depends on the particular idea Jerry has (which he's not shared).  An example of a part manufactured for certificated aircraft that does not have either PMA, TSO, or type production certificate, or that would even require final finishing by the owner, is shoulder harnesses manufactured for installation under FAA Policy Statement ACE-00-23.561-01.  This can be shoulder harnesses which meet "the certification basis" of the aircraft, which for aircraft mfd prior to Sep. 14, 1988, may be none.  Therefore a shoulder harness manufactured under Society of Automotive Engineers Std 8043, notwithstanding the fact that it does not meet FAR 21.303, may be manufactured, sold, and installed under the rules of FAR 43 as a "minor change".  One made under a Mil-Spec can be used, and it isn't made under a PMA or TSO either.  (In fact, any harness, automotive or not, in good condition and appropriate to the use, may be mfr'd, sold, and installed thusly.)   Admittedly this is a rare example, but not knowing precisely Jerry's idea, it's difficult to say.</HTML>

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